Articles | Volume 18, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 979–1002, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-979-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 979–1002, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-979-2018

Research article 25 Jan 2018

Research article | 25 Jan 2018

Atmospheric histories and emissions of chlorofluorocarbons CFC-13 (CClF3), ΣCFC-114 (C2Cl2F4), and CFC-115 (C2ClF5)

Martin K. Vollmer et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Martin Vollmer on behalf of the Authors (06 Dec 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (11 Dec 2017) by Neil M. Donahue

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Martin Vollmer on behalf of the Authors (24 Jan 2018)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (24 Jan 2018) by Neil M. Donahue
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Short summary
We measured the three chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) CFC-13, CFC-114, and CFC-115 in the atmosphere because they are important in stratospheric ozone depletion. These compounds should have decreased in the atmosphere because they are banned by the Montreal Protocol but we find the opposite. Emissions over the last decade have not declined on a global scale. We use inverse modeling and our observations to find that a large part of the emissions originate in the Asian region.
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