Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 3065–3082, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-3065-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 3065–3082, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-3065-2018

Research article 02 Mar 2018

Research article | 02 Mar 2018

Contrasting the co-variability of daytime cloud and precipitation over tropical land and ocean

Daeho Jin et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by daeho jin on behalf of the Authors (21 Dec 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Dec 2017) by Thomas Wagner
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (10 Jan 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (14 Jan 2018)
ED: Publish as is (14 Jan 2018) by Thomas Wagner
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Short summary
To what degree can precipitation be predicted given information about clouds? Or, conversely, with precipitation information at hand, can we provide good guesses about the clouds responsible? To answer these questions, we performed joint analysis of rainfall and cloud data, which are significantly decoupled. We find that only for the deepest and thickest clouds does cloud amount relate strongly with the intensity of rainfall, and that the details are different over oceans and land.
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