Articles | Volume 18, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 13135–13153, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-13135-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 13135–13153, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-13135-2018

Research article 12 Sep 2018

Research article | 12 Sep 2018

Quantifying the vertical transport of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 over the western Pacific

Robyn Butler et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Robyn Butler on behalf of the Authors (06 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 Sep 2017) by Rolf Müller
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (05 Oct 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (12 Oct 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (20 Oct 2017) by Rolf Müller
AR by Paul Palmer on behalf of the Authors (02 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Jul 2018) by Rolf Müller
AR by Paul Palmer on behalf of the Authors (25 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Natural sources of short-lived bromoform and dibromomethane are important for determining the inorganic bromine budget in the stratosphere that drives ozone loss. Two new modelling techniques describe how different geographical source regions influence their atmospheric variability over the western Pacific. We find that it is driven primarily by open ocean sources, and we use atmospheric observations to help estimate their contributions to the upper tropospheric inorganic bromine budget.
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