Articles | Volume 18, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10177–10198, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10177-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10177–10198, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10177-2018

Research article 17 Jul 2018

Research article | 17 Jul 2018

Cloud, precipitation and radiation responses to large perturbations in global dimethyl sulfide

Sonya L. Fiddes et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Sonya Fiddes on behalf of the Authors (23 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (02 May 2018) by Toshihiko Takemura
AR by Sonya Fiddes on behalf of the Authors (03 May 2018)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 May 2018) by Toshihiko Takemura
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 May 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (04 Jun 2018)
ED: Publish as is (05 Jun 2018) by Toshihiko Takemura
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Short summary
The role of natural aerosol in the climate system is uncertain. A key contributor to marine aerosol is dimethyl sulfide (DMS), released by phytoplankton in the oceans. We study the effect of DMS on clouds and rain using a climate model with a detailed aerosol scheme. We show that DMS acts to reduce rainfall in cloud deck regions, leading to longer lived clouds and a large impact on solar energy reaching the surface. Further study of these areas will improve future climate projections.
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