Articles | Volume 16, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 12925–12944, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12925-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 12925–12944, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-12925-2016

Research article 19 Oct 2016

Research article | 19 Oct 2016

How can we understand the global distribution of the solar cycle signal on the Earth's surface?

Kunihiko Kodera et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kunihiko Kodera on behalf of the Authors (03 Jun 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Jun 2016) by Peter Haynes
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (04 Jul 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (12 Jul 2016)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (27 Jul 2016) by Peter Haynes
AR by Kunihiko Kodera on behalf of the Authors (12 Sep 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (28 Sep 2016) by Peter Haynes
AR by Kunihiko Kodera on behalf of the Authors (04 Oct 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
Short summary
The spatial structure of the solar cycle signals on the Earth's surface is analysed to identify the mechanisms. Both tropical and extratropical solar surface signals can result from circulation changes in the upper stratosphere through (i) a downward migration of wave zonal mean flow interactions and (ii) changes in the stratospheric mean meridional circulation. Amplification of the solar signal also occurs through interaction with the ocean.
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