Articles | Volume 23, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-3133-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-3133-2023
Research article
 | 
10 Mar 2023
Research article |  | 10 Mar 2023

South Pole Station ozonesondes: variability and trends in the springtime Antarctic ozone hole 1986–2021

Bryan J. Johnson, Patrick Cullis, John Booth, Irina Petropavlovskikh, Glen McConville, Birgit Hassler, Gary A. Morris, Chance Sterling, and Samuel Oltmans

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Latest update: 14 Jul 2024
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Short summary
In 1986, soon after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, NOAA began year-round ozonesonde observations at South Pole Station to measure vertical profiles of ozone and temperature from the surface to 35 km. Balloon-borne ozonesondes launched at this unique site allow for tracking all phases of the yearly springtime ozone hole beginning in late winter and after sunrise, when rapid ozone depletion begins over the South Pole throughout the month of September.
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