Articles | Volume 22, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 11889–11930, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-11889-2022

Special issue: Arctic climate, air quality, and health impacts from short-lived...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 11889–11930, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-11889-2022
Research article
14 Sep 2022
Research article | 14 Sep 2022

Newly identified climatically and environmentally significant high-latitude dust sources

Outi Meinander et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Outi Meinander on behalf of the Authors (08 Apr 2022)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Apr 2022) by Susannah Burrows
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (29 Apr 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 May 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (22 May 2022) by Susannah Burrows
AR by Outi Meinander on behalf of the Authors (31 May 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Jun 2022) by Susannah Burrows
AR by Outi Meinander on behalf of the Authors (21 Jun 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
High-latitude dust (HLD) is a short-lived climate forcer, air pollutant, and nutrient source. Our results suggest a northern HLD belt at 50–58° N in Eurasia and 50–55° N in Canada and at >60° N in Eurasia and >58° N in Canada. Our addition to the previously identified global dust belt (GDB) provides crucially needed information on the extent of active HLD sources with both direct and indirect impacts on climate and environment in remote regions, which are often poorly understood and predicted.
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