Articles | Volume 22, issue 16
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10875-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10875-2022
Research article
 | 
26 Aug 2022
Research article |  | 26 Aug 2022

Evaluating NOx emissions and their effect on O3 production in Texas using TROPOMI NO2 and HCHO

Daniel L. Goldberg, Monica Harkey, Benjamin de Foy, Laura Judd, Jeremiah Johnson, Greg Yarwood, and Tracey Holloway

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Short summary
TROPOMI measurements offer a valuable means to validate emissions inventories and ozone formation regimes, with important limitations. Lightning NOx is important to account for in Texas and can contribute up to 24 % of the column NO2 in rural areas and 8 % in urban areas. Modeled NO2 in urban areas agrees with TROPOMI NO2 to within 20 % in most circumstances, with a small underestimate in Dallas (−13 %) and Houston (−20 %). Near Texas power plants, the satellite appears to underrepresent NO2.
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