Articles | Volume 22, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10789–10807, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10789-2022

Special issue: New observations and related modelling studies of the aerosol–cloud–climate...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10789–10807, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10789-2022
Research article
25 Aug 2022
Research article | 25 Aug 2022

Source attribution of cloud condensation nuclei and their impact on stratocumulus clouds and radiation in the south-eastern Atlantic

Haochi Che et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-43', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Review of Che et al.', Anonymous Referee #2, 02 Mar 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on acp-2022-43', Anonymous Referee #3, 23 Mar 2022
  • AC1: 'Response to all reviewers', Haochi Che, 16 May 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Haochi Che on behalf of the Authors (16 May 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (29 May 2022) by Paquita Zuidema
AR by Haochi Che on behalf of the Authors (23 Jul 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (29 Jul 2022) by Paquita Zuidema
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Short summary
Extensive stratocumulus clouds over the south-eastern Atlantic (SEA) can lead to a cooling effect on the climate. A key pathway by which aerosols affect cloud properties is by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Here, we investigated the source attribution of CCN in the SEA as well as the cloud responses. Our results show that aerosol nucleation contributes most to CCN in the marine boundary layer. In terms of emissions, anthropogenic sources contribute most to the CCN and cloud droplets.
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