Articles | Volume 22, issue 15
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10195–10219, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10195-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10195–10219, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10195-2022
Research article
10 Aug 2022
Research article | 10 Aug 2022

Simulating wildfire emissions and plume rise using geostationary satellite fire radiative power measurements: a case study of the 2019 Williams Flats fire

Aditya Kumar et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-33', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Mar 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2022-33', Anonymous Referee #3, 10 May 2022
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2022-33', Aditya Kumar, 14 Jul 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Aditya Kumar on behalf of the Authors (14 Jul 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (16 Jul 2022) by Dantong Liu
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (20 Jul 2022)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (20 Jul 2022) by Dantong Liu
AR by Aditya Kumar on behalf of the Authors (26 Jul 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
We use the WRF-Chem model with new implementations of GOES-16 wildfire emissions and plume rise based on fire radiative power (FRP) to interpret aerosol observations during the 2019 NASA–NOAA FIREX-AQ field campaign and perform model evaluations. The model shows significant improvements in simulating the variety of aerosol loading environments sampled during FIREX-AQ. Our results also highlight the importance of accurate wildfire diurnal cycle and aerosol chemical mechanisms in models.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint