Articles | Volume 21, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 7947–7961, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-7947-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 7947–7961, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-7947-2021

Research article 25 May 2021

Research article | 25 May 2021

Lidar observations of cirrus clouds in Palau (7°33′ N, 134°48′ E)

Francesco Cairo et al.

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Short summary
A lidar was used in Palau from February–March 2016. Clouds were observed peaking at 3 km below the high cold-point tropopause (CPT). Their occurrence was linked with cold anomalies, while in warm cases, cirrus clouds were restricted to 5 km below the CPT. Thin subvisible cirrus (SVC) near the CPT had distinctive characteristics. They were linked to wave-induced cold anomalies. Back trajectories are mostly compatible with convective outflow, while some distinctive SVC may originate in situ.
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