Articles | Volume 21, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 7947–7961, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-7947-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 7947–7961, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-7947-2021

Research article 25 May 2021

Research article | 25 May 2021

Lidar observations of cirrus clouds in Palau (7°33′ N, 134°48′ E)

Francesco Cairo et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Francesco Cairo on behalf of the Authors (22 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Feb 2021) by Matthias Tesche
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (11 Mar 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (12 Mar 2021) by Matthias Tesche
AR by Francesco Cairo on behalf of the Authors (17 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Mar 2021) by Matthias Tesche
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Short summary
A lidar was used in Palau from February–March 2016. Clouds were observed peaking at 3 km below the high cold-point tropopause (CPT). Their occurrence was linked with cold anomalies, while in warm cases, cirrus clouds were restricted to 5 km below the CPT. Thin subvisible cirrus (SVC) near the CPT had distinctive characteristics. They were linked to wave-induced cold anomalies. Back trajectories are mostly compatible with convective outflow, while some distinctive SVC may originate in situ.
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