Articles | Volume 21, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5393–5414, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5393-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 5393–5414, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-5393-2021
Research article
08 Apr 2021
Research article | 08 Apr 2021

Using TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) measurements and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) CO modelling to understand the contribution of meteorology and emissions to an extreme air pollution event in India

Ashique Vellalassery et al.

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Short summary
We investigate factors contributing to the severe and persistent air quality degradation in northern India that has worsened during every winter over the last decade. This is achieved by implementing atmospheric modelling and using recently available Sentinel-5 P satellite data for carbon monoxide. We see a minimal role of biomass burning, except for the state of Punjab. The aim is to focus on residential and industrial emission reduction strategies to tackle air pollution over northern India.
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