Articles | Volume 21, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-3607-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-3607-2021
Research article
 | 
09 Mar 2021
Research article |  | 09 Mar 2021

Compositions and mixing states of aerosol particles by aircraft observations in the Arctic springtime, 2018

Kouji Adachi, Naga Oshima, Sho Ohata, Atsushi Yoshida, Nobuhiro Moteki, and Makoto Koike

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Latest update: 03 Mar 2024
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Short summary
Aerosol particles influence the Arctic climate by interacting with solar radiation, forming clouds, and melting surface snow and ice. Individual-particle analyses using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and model simulations provide evidence of biomass burning and anthropogenic contributions to the Arctic aerosols by showing a wide range of compositions and mixing states depending on sampling altitude. Our results reveal the aerosol aging processes and climate influences in the Arctic.
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