Articles | Volume 21, issue 23
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-17577-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-17577-2021
Research article
 | 
03 Dec 2021
Research article |  | 03 Dec 2021

Intercomparison of middle atmospheric meteorological analyses for the Northern Hemisphere winter 2009–2010

John P. McCormack, V. Lynn Harvey, Cora E. Randall, Nicholas Pedatella, Dai Koshin, Kaoru Sato, Lawrence Coy, Shingo Watanabe, Fabrizio Sassi, and Laura A. Holt

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Cited articles

Anderson, J. L., Hoar, T., Raeder, K., Liu, H., Collins, N., Torn, R., and Arellano, A. F.: The Data Assimilation Research Testbed: A community data assimilation facility, B. Am. Meteorol. Soc., 90, 1283–1296, https://doi.org/10.1175/2009BAMS2618.1, 2009. 
Becker, E. and Vadas, S. L.: Secondary gravity waves in the winter mesosphere: Results from a high-resolution global circulation model, J. Geophys. Res., 123, 2605–2627, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017JD027460, 2018. 
Beres, J. H., Garcia, R. R., Boville, B. A., and Sassi, F.: Implementation of a gravity wave source spectrum parameterization dependent on the properties of convection in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), J. Geophys. Res., 110, D10108, https://doi.org/10.1029/2004JD005504, 2005. 
Bosilovich, M., Akella, S., Coy, L., Cullather, R., Draper, C., Gelaro, R., Kovach, R., Liu, Q., Molod, A., Norris, P., Wargan, K., Chao, W., Reichle, R., Takacs, L., Vikhliaev, Y., Bloom, S., Collow, A., Firth, S., Labow, G., Partyka, G., Pawson, S., Reale, O., Schubert, S. D., and Suarez, M.: MERRA-2: Initial evaluation of the climate, NASA Tech. Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation, NASA/TM–2015-104606, Vol. 43, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, 2015. 
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In order to have confidence in atmospheric predictions, it is important to know how well different numerical model simulations of the Earth’s atmosphere agree with one another. This work compares four different data assimilation models that extend to or beyond the mesosphere. Results shown here demonstrate that while the models are in close agreement below ~50 km, large differences arise at higher altitudes in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere that will need to be reconciled in the future.
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