Articles | Volume 21, issue 23
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 17453–17494, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-17453-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 17453–17494, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-17453-2021

Research article 01 Dec 2021

Research article | 01 Dec 2021

Was Australia a sink or source of CO2 in 2015? Data assimilation using OCO-2 satellite measurements

Yohanna Villalobos et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-16', Anonymous Referee #1, 22 Apr 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Yohanna Villalobos Cortes, 31 May 2021
  • CC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-16', David Baker, 31 May 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-16', Sourish Basu, 01 Jun 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Yohanna Villalobos Cortes on behalf of the Authors (13 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (24 Sep 2021) by Abhishek Chatterjee
AR by Yohanna Villalobos Cortes on behalf of the Authors (04 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Oct 2021) by Abhishek Chatterjee
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Short summary
Semi-arid ecosystems such as those in Australia are evolving and might play an essential role in the future of climate change. We use carbon dioxide concentrations derived from the OCO-2 satellite instrument and a regional transport model to understand if Australia was a carbon sink or source of CO2 in 2015. Our research's main findings suggest that Australia acted as a carbon sink of about −0.41 ± 0.08 petagrams of carbon in 2015, driven primarily by savanna and sparsely vegetated ecosystems.
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