Articles | Volume 21, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14851–14869, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14851-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14851–14869, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14851-2021
Research article
06 Oct 2021
Research article | 06 Oct 2021

Sources of black carbon at residential and traffic environments obtained by two source apportionment methods

Sanna Saarikoski et al.

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Short summary
This study presents the main sources of black carbon (BC) at two urban environments. The largest fraction of BC originated from biomass burning at the residential site (38 %) and from vehicular emissions (57 %) in the street canyon. Also, a significant fraction of BC was associated with urban background or long-range transport. The data are needed by modelers and authorities when assessing climate and air quality impact of BC as well as directing the emission legislation and mitigation actions.
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