Articles | Volume 21, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 11201–11224, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-11201-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 11201–11224, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-11201-2021

Research article 27 Jul 2021

Research article | 27 Jul 2021

Secondary organic aerosols from anthropogenic volatile organic compounds contribute substantially to air pollution mortality

Benjamin A. Nault et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Benjamin A Nault on behalf of the Authors (01 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 May 2021) by Maria Kanakidou
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (03 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Jun 2021) by Maria Kanakidou
AR by Benjamin A Nault on behalf of the Authors (16 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Jun 2021) by Maria Kanakidou
AR by Benjamin A Nault on behalf of the Authors (25 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important aspect of poor air quality for urban regions around the world, where a large fraction of the population lives. However, there is still large uncertainty in predicting SOA in urban regions. Here, we used data from 11 urban campaigns and show that the variability in SOA production in these regions is predictable and is explained by key emissions. These results are used to estimate the premature mortality associated with SOA in urban regions.
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