Articles | Volume 20, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-3061-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-3061-2020
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16 Mar 2020
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 16 Mar 2020

Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide and acetone over biologically productive waters in the southwest Pacific Ocean

Sarah J. Lawson, Cliff S. Law, Mike J. Harvey, Thomas G. Bell, Carolyn F. Walker, Warren J. de Bruyn, and Eric S. Saltzman

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Latest update: 21 Feb 2024
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Short summary
Methanethiol (MeSH) is a reduced sulfur gas originating from phytoplankton, with a global ocean source of ~ 17 % of dimethyl sulfide (DMS). It has been little studied and is rarely observed over the ocean. In this work, MeSH was measured at much higher levels than previously observed (3–36 % of parallel DMS mixing ratios). MeSH could be a significant source of atmospheric sulfur over productive regions of the ocean, but its distribution, and its atmospheric impact, requires more investigation.
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