Articles | Volume 20, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 2911–2925, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-2911-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 2911–2925, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-2911-2020

Research article 11 Mar 2020

Research article | 11 Mar 2020

How much does traffic contribute to benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon air pollution? Results from a high-resolution North American air quality model centred on Toronto, Canada

Cynthia H. Whaley et al.

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Short summary
Benzene and polycyclic aromatic compounds are toxic air pollutants and ubiquitous in the environment. Using a chemical transport model, we have determined the net impact of vehicle emissions on ambient concentrations of these species. Traffic emissions were found to be a significant fraction of ambient pollution in the densely populated modelled region of North America. Our simulations demonstrate the air quality benefits that would result from transitioning to a zero-emission vehicle fleet.
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