Articles | Volume 20, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 12347–12361, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12347-2020

Special issue: The Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) (ACP/GMD inter-journal...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 12347–12361, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-12347-2020

Research article 29 Oct 2020

Research article | 29 Oct 2020

The impact of weather patterns and related transport processes on aviation's contribution to ozone and methane concentrations from NOx emissions

Simon Rosanka et al.

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Latest update: 18 Oct 2021
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Short summary
Aviation-attributed nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions lead to an increase in ozone and a depletion of methane. We investigate the impact of weather-related transport processes on these induced composition changes. Subsidence in high-pressure systems leads to earlier ozone maxima due to an enhanced chemical activity. Background NOx and hydroperoxyl radicals limit the total ozone change during summer and winter, respectively. High water vapour concentrations lead to a high methane depletion.
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