Articles | Volume 20, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11223–11244, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11223-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 11223–11244, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-11223-2020

Research article 01 Oct 2020

Research article | 01 Oct 2020

Trends of atmospheric water vapour in Switzerland from ground-based radiometry, FTIR and GNSS data

Leonie Bernet et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Leonie Bernet on behalf of the Authors (14 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Jul 2020) by Geraint Vaughan
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (18 Aug 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Aug 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Aug 2020) by Geraint Vaughan
AR by Leonie Bernet on behalf of the Authors (27 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (04 Sep 2020) by Geraint Vaughan
AR by Leonie Bernet on behalf of the Authors (05 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
With global warming, water vapour increases in the atmosphere. Water vapour is an important gas because it is a natural greenhouse gas and affects the formation of clouds, rain and snow. How much water vapour increases can vary in different regions of the world. To verify if it increases as expected on a regional scale, we analysed water vapour measurements in Switzerland. We found that water vapour generally increases as expected from temperature changes, except in winter.
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