Articles | Volume 20, issue 18
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10911-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10911-2020
Research article
 | 
22 Sep 2020
Research article |  | 22 Sep 2020

Examining the atmospheric radiative and snow-darkening effects of black carbon and dust across the Rocky Mountains of the United States using WRF-Chem

Stefan Rahimi, Xiaohong Liu, Chun Zhao, Zheng Lu, and Zachary J. Lebo

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Latest update: 27 May 2024
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Short summary
Dark particles emitted to the atmosphere can absorb sunlight and heat the air. As these particles settle, they may darken the surface, especially over snow-covered regions like the Rocky Mountains. This darkening of the surface may lead to changes in snowpack, affecting the local meteorology and hydrology. We seek to evaluate whether these light-absorbing particles more prominently affect this region through their atmospheric presence or their on-snow presence.
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