Articles | Volume 19, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 9399–9412, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-9399-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 9399–9412, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-9399-2019

Research article 23 Jul 2019

Research article | 23 Jul 2019

Predicted ultrafine particulate matter source contribution across the continental United States during summertime air pollution events

Melissa A. Venecek et al.

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Latest update: 12 Apr 2021
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Short summary
Atmospheric ultrafine particles with a diameter < 100 nm are more toxic than larger particles. There are no measurement networks for ultrafine particles, but concentrations can be predicted using models. On-road vehicles, cooking, and aircraft are important sources of ultrafine particles as expected, but natural gas combustion was also found to be a significant source in cities across the United States. Results like this may support future health-effects studies on ultrafine particles.
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