Articles | Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4851–4862, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4851-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4851–4862, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4851-2019

Research article 11 Apr 2019

Research article | 11 Apr 2019

Satellite-derived sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from the 2014–2015 Holuhraun eruption (Iceland)

Elisa Carboni et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Elisa Carboni on behalf of the Authors (19 Dec 2018)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (24 Jan 2019) by Rainer Volkamer
AR by Elisa Carboni on behalf of the Authors (06 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Mar 2019) by Rainer Volkamer
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Short summary
The 2014–2015 Holuhraun eruption was the largest in Iceland for 200 years, emitting huge quantities of gas into the troposphere, at times overwhelming European anthropogenic emissions. Infrared Atmospheric sounding Interferometer data are used to derive the first time series of daily sulfur dioxide mass and vertical distribution over the eruption period. A scheme is used to estimate sulfur dioxide fluxes, the total erupted mass, and how long the sulfur dioxide remains in the atmosphere.
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