Articles | Volume 18, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9263–9281, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9263-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9263–9281, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9263-2018
Research article
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03 Jul 2018
Research article  | Highlight paper | 03 Jul 2018

High- and low-temperature pyrolysis profiles describe volatile organic compound emissions from western US wildfire fuels

Kanako Sekimoto et al.

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Short summary
We found that on average 85 % of the VOC emissions from biomass burning across various fuels representative of the western US (including various coniferous and chaparral fuels) can be explained using only two emission profiles: (i) a high-temperature pyrolysis profile and (ii) a low-temperature pyrolysis profile. The high-temperature profile is quantitatively similar between different fuel types (r2 > 0.84), and likewise for the low-temperature profile.
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