Articles | Volume 18, issue 13
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9263-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9263-2018
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03 Jul 2018
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 03 Jul 2018

High- and low-temperature pyrolysis profiles describe volatile organic compound emissions from western US wildfire fuels

Kanako Sekimoto, Abigail R. Koss, Jessica B. Gilman, Vanessa Selimovic, Matthew M. Coggon, Kyle J. Zarzana, Bin Yuan, Brian M. Lerner, Steven S. Brown, Carsten Warneke, Robert J. Yokelson, James M. Roberts, and Joost de Gouw

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Latest update: 29 Feb 2024
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Short summary
We found that on average 85 % of the VOC emissions from biomass burning across various fuels representative of the western US (including various coniferous and chaparral fuels) can be explained using only two emission profiles: (i) a high-temperature pyrolysis profile and (ii) a low-temperature pyrolysis profile. The high-temperature profile is quantitatively similar between different fuel types (r2 > 0.84), and likewise for the low-temperature profile.
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