Articles | Volume 18, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 705–733, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-705-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 705–733, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-705-2018
Research article
22 Jan 2018
Research article | 22 Jan 2018

Drivers for spatial, temporal and long-term trends in atmospheric ammonia and ammonium in the UK

Yuk S. Tang et al.

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Short summary
A unique long-term dataset of NH3 and NH4+ data from the NAMN is used to assess spatial, seasonal and long-term variability across the UK. NH3 is spatially variable, with distinct temporal profiles according to source types. NH4+ is spatially smoother, with peak concentrations in spring from long-range transport. Decrease in NH3 is smaller than emissions, but NH4+ decreased faster than NH3, due to a shift from stable (NH4)2SO4 to semi-volatile NH4NO3, increasing the atmospheric lifetime of NH3.
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