Articles | Volume 18, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5391–5413, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5391-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5391–5413, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5391-2018

Research article 20 Apr 2018

Research article | 20 Apr 2018

Considering the future of anthropogenic gas-phase organic compound emissions and the increasing influence of non-combustion sources on urban air quality

Peeyush Khare and Drew R. Gentner

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AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (07 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (27 Mar 2018) by Paul Monks
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Short summary
Following decades of successful regulatory policies focused on combustion-related sources (e.g. motor vehicles), emissions from non-combustion sources have become increasingly important for urban air quality. Using multiple approaches, we demonstrate that emissions from consumer, commercial, and industrial products and materials have become prominent contributors to the formation of photochemical smog (i.e. secondary organic particulate matter and ozone) and its associated health effects.
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