Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 3755–3778, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-3755-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 3755–3778, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-3755-2018

Research article 14 Mar 2018

Research article | 14 Mar 2018

The meteorology and chemistry of high nitrogen oxide concentrations in the stable boundary layer at the South Pole

William Neff et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by William Neff on behalf of the Authors (28 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (30 Jan 2018) by Anna Jones
AR by William Neff on behalf of the Authors (02 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Our study examined the effect of the seasonal cycle in meteorology from November through December and the role of stratospheric ozone depletion in the photochemical production of nitrogen oxide (NO) from nitrate in the snow at the South Pole. We found that ozone depletion which now extends into late November–early December coincides with optimum meteorological conditions (clear skies, a stable shallow boundary layer, and light winds) for high concentrations of NO to accumulate at the surface.
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