Articles | Volume 18, issue 21
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15601-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15601-2018
Research article
 | 
30 Oct 2018
Research article |  | 30 Oct 2018

Source apportionment of fine particulate matter in Houston, Texas: insights to secondary organic aerosols

Ibrahim M. Al-Naiema, Anusha P. S. Hettiyadura, Henry W. Wallace, Nancy P. Sanchez, Carter J. Madler, Basak Karakurt Cevik, Alexander A. T. Bui, Josh Kettler, Robert J. Griffin, and Elizabeth A. Stone

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Short summary
By integrating newly developed tracers for anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol in source apportionment for the first time, we estimate that this source contributes 28 % of fine particle organic carbon in the Houston Ship Channel. Our approach can be used to evaluate anthropogenic, biogenic, and biomass burning contributions to secondary organic aerosols elsewhere in the world. Because anthropogenic emissions are potentially controllable, they provide an opportunity to improve air quality.
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