Articles | Volume 18, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15601–15622, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15601-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15601–15622, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15601-2018

Research article 30 Oct 2018

Research article | 30 Oct 2018

Source apportionment of fine particulate matter in Houston, Texas: insights to secondary organic aerosols

Ibrahim M. Al-Naiema et al.

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AR by Elizabeth Stone on behalf of the Authors (01 Sep 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Sep 2018) by Jacqui Hamilton
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Short summary
By integrating newly developed tracers for anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol in source apportionment for the first time, we estimate that this source contributes 28 % of fine particle organic carbon in the Houston Ship Channel. Our approach can be used to evaluate anthropogenic, biogenic, and biomass burning contributions to secondary organic aerosols elsewhere in the world. Because anthropogenic emissions are potentially controllable, they provide an opportunity to improve air quality.
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