Articles | Volume 18, issue 20
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15307–15327, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15307-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 15307–15327, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-15307-2018

Research article 24 Oct 2018

Research article | 24 Oct 2018

Top-down estimates of black carbon emissions at high latitudes using an atmospheric transport model and a Bayesian inversion framework

Nikolaos Evangeliou et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Nikolaos Evangeliou on behalf of the Authors (27 Sep 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Oct 2018) by Athanasios Nenes
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (05 Oct 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Oct 2018)
ED: Publish as is (11 Oct 2018) by Athanasios Nenes
AR by Nikolaos Evangeliou on behalf of the Authors (12 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We present BC inversions at high northern latitudes in 2013–2015. The emissions were high close to the gas flaring regions in Russia and in western Canada. The posterior emissions of BC at latitudes > 50° N were estimated as 560 ± 171 kt yr-1, smaller than in bottom-up inventories. Posterior concentrations over the Arctic compared with independent observations from flight and ship campaigns showed small biases. Seasonal maxima were estimated in summer months due to biomass burning, mainly in Europe.
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