Articles | Volume 18, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12715–12734, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12715-2018

Special issue: South AMerican Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA)

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 12715–12734, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-12715-2018

Research article 04 Sep 2018

Research article | 04 Sep 2018

Biomass burning emission disturbances of isoprene oxidation in a tropical forest

Fernando Santos et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Fernando Santos on behalf of the Authors (25 May 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (29 May 2018) by Meinrat O. Andreae
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Jun 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (11 Jun 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (12 Jun 2018)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (20 Jun 2018) by Meinrat O. Andreae
AR by Fernando Santos on behalf of the Authors (03 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We investigated the impact of biomass burning on the chemical composition of trace gases in the Amazon. The findings corroborate the influence of biomass burning activity not only on direct emissions of particulate matter but also on the oxidative capacity to produce secondary organic aerosol. The scientists plan to use this information to improve the numerical model simulation with a better representativeness of the chemical processes, which can impact on global climate prediction.
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