Articles | Volume 18, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10521–10555, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10521-2018

Special issue: BACCHUS – Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 10521–10555, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10521-2018

Research article 24 Jul 2018

Research article | 24 Jul 2018

How important are future marine and shipping aerosol emissions in a warming Arctic summer and autumn?

Anina Gilgen et al.

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AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (18 May 2018)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (25 May 2018) by Holger Tost
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (05 Jun 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (07 Jun 2018) by Holger Tost
AR by Anina Gilgen on behalf of the Authors (22 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (02 Jul 2018) by Holger Tost
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Short summary
Aerosol emissions in Arctic summer and autumn are expected to increase in the future because of sea ice retreat. Using a global aerosol–climate model, we quantify the impact of increased aerosol emissions from the ocean and from Arctic shipping in the year 2050. The influence on radiation of both aerosols and clouds is analysed. Mainly driven by changes in surface albedo, the cooling effect of marine aerosols and clouds will increase. Future ship emissions might have a small net cooling effect.
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