Articles | Volume 17, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8081–8100, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8081-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8081–8100, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8081-2017

Research article 04 Jul 2017

Research article | 04 Jul 2017

Impact of aerosols and clouds on decadal trends in all-sky solar radiation over the Netherlands (1966–2015)

Reinout Boers et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Reinout Boers on behalf of the Authors (08 May 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (10 May 2017) by Stelios Kazadzis
AR by Reinout Boers on behalf of the Authors (15 May 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 May 2017) by Stelios Kazadzis
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Short summary
In the Netherlands 9 W m−2 more solar radiation falls on the surface today than 50 years ago. Often this increase, which has also been detected in surrounding western Europe, has been attributed to decreasing air pollution due to improved regulatory practices. However, over the Netherlands clouds play an important but ambiguous role. Cloud cover has increased but have become optically thinner as well. Here, the impact of clouds on radiation is in fact more important than that of air pollution.
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