Articles | Volume 17, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8081–8100, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8081-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 8081–8100, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-8081-2017
Research article
04 Jul 2017
Research article | 04 Jul 2017

Impact of aerosols and clouds on decadal trends in all-sky solar radiation over the Netherlands (1966–2015)

Reinout Boers et al.

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Short summary
In the Netherlands 9 W m−2 more solar radiation falls on the surface today than 50 years ago. Often this increase, which has also been detected in surrounding western Europe, has been attributed to decreasing air pollution due to improved regulatory practices. However, over the Netherlands clouds play an important but ambiguous role. Cloud cover has increased but have become optically thinner as well. Here, the impact of clouds on radiation is in fact more important than that of air pollution.
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