Articles | Volume 17, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 4751–4768, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4751-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 4751–4768, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4751-2017
Research article
11 Apr 2017
Research article | 11 Apr 2017

Wintertime aerosol chemistry and haze evolution in an extremely polluted city of the North China Plain: significant contribution from coal and biomass combustion

Haiyan Li et al.

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Short summary
The sources and aerosol evolution processes of severe pollution episodes were investigated in Handan during wintertime using real-time measurements. An in-depth analysis of the data uncovered that primary emissions from coal combustion and biomass burning together with secondary formation of sulfate (mainly from SO2 emitted by coal combustion) are important driving factors for haze evolution. Our findings provide useful insights into air pollution control in heavily polluted regions.
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