Articles | Volume 17, issue 6
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4355-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-4355-2017
Research article
 | 
30 Mar 2017
Research article |  | 30 Mar 2017

Influence of 2000–2050 climate change on particulate matter in the United States: results from a new statistical model

Lu Shen, Loretta J. Mickley, and Lee T. Murray

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Short summary
We introduce a new method to characterize the influence of atmospheric circulation on surface PM2.5 concentrations. Applying our statistical model to climate projections, we find a strong influence of 2000–2050 climate change on PM2.5 air quality in the United States. We find that current atmospheric chemistry models may underestimate the strong positive sensitivity of PM2.5 to temperature in the eastern United States in summer, and so may underestimate PM2.5 changes in a warmer climate.
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