Articles | Volume 17, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 3385–3399, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-3385-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 3385–3399, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-3385-2017

Research article 09 Mar 2017

Research article | 09 Mar 2017

Interpreting the 13C  ∕ 12C ratio of carbon dioxide in an urban airshed in the Yangtze River Delta, China

Jiaping Xu et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (23 Aug 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (29 Aug 2016) by Jan Kaiser
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (18 Sep 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (03 Oct 2016)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Dec 2016) by Jan Kaiser
AR by Xuhui Lee on behalf of the Authors (15 Jan 2017)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Jan 2017) by Jan Kaiser
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (29 Jan 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (03 Feb 2017)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (03 Feb 2017) by Jan Kaiser
AR by Xuhui Lee on behalf of the Authors (12 Feb 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (13 Feb 2017) by Jan Kaiser
AR by Xuhui Lee on behalf of the Authors (15 Feb 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (16 Feb 2017) by Jan Kaiser
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Short summary
The Yangtze River Delta is one of the most industrialized regions in China. In situ optical isotopic measurement in Nanjing, a city located in the Delta, showed unusually high atmospheric δ13C signals in the summer (−7.44 ‰, July 2013 mean), which we attributed to the influence of cement production in the region. Flux partitioning calculations revealed that natural ecosystems in the region were a negligibly small source of atmospheric CO2.
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