Articles | Volume 17, issue 3
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2347–2357, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2347-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 2347–2357, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-2347-2017
Research article
14 Feb 2017
Research article | 14 Feb 2017

Formation of secondary organic aerosols from the ozonolysis of dihydrofurans

Yolanda Diaz-de-Mera et al.

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Latest update: 07 Aug 2022
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Short summary
Criegee intermediates are involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. How? Recent works show that they contribute to the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. We have found that the studied ozonolysis reactions only led to nucleation in the presence of SO2, which behaved as a catalyst. So the role of SO2 to form SOA depends on the structure of the alkene. For these reactions, the formation of low-volatility organic acid is expected to be responsible for nucleation, since SO3 was not released.
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