Articles | Volume 17, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 15069–15093, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-15069-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 15069–15093, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-15069-2017

Research article 20 Dec 2017

Research article | 20 Dec 2017

How long do satellites need to overlap? Evaluation of climate data stability from overlapping satellite records

Elizabeth C. Weatherhead et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Elizabeth Weatherhead on behalf of the Authors (04 May 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Jun 2017) by William Ward
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (14 Jun 2017)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (20 Jun 2017) by William Ward
AR by Elizabeth Weatherhead on behalf of the Authors (30 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Jul 2017) by William Ward
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Short summary
Satellite overlap is often carried out as a check on the stability of the data collected. We looked at how length of overlap influences how much information can be derived from the overlap period. Several results surprised us: the confidence we could have in the matchup of two records was independent of the offset, and understanding of the relative drift between the two satellite data sets improved significantly with 2–3 years of overlap. Sudden jumps could easily be confused with drift.
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