Articles | Volume 17, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1297–1311, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1297-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 1297–1311, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-1297-2017

Research article 27 Jan 2017

Research article | 27 Jan 2017

Influence of enhanced Asian NOx emissions on ozone in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in chemistry–climate model simulations

Chaitri Roy et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by S. Fadnavis on behalf of the Authors (08 Dec 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Dec 2016) by Martin Dameris
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (13 Dec 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Dec 2016)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (22 Dec 2016) by Martin Dameris
AR by S. Fadnavis on behalf of the Authors (29 Dec 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 Jan 2017) by Martin Dameris
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Short summary
In the monsoon season, Asian NOx emissions are rapidly transported to the UTLS and can impact ozone in the UTLS. From chemistry–climate model simulations, we show that increasing Asian NOx emissions have enhanced ozone radiative forcing over Southeast Asia, which leads to significant warming over the Tibetan Plateau and increase precipitation over India. However, a further increase in NOx emissions elicited negative precipitation due to reversal of monsoon Hadley circulation.
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