Articles | Volume 17, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 12145–12175, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-12145-2017
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 12145–12175, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-12145-2017

Research article 12 Oct 2017

Research article | 12 Oct 2017

Uncertainty from the choice of microphysics scheme in convection-permitting models significantly exceeds aerosol effects

Bethan White et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Bethan White on behalf of the Authors (06 Jan 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Jan 2017) by Radovan Krejci
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (30 Jan 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (07 Mar 2017)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (09 Mar 2017) by Radovan Krejci
AR by Bethan White on behalf of the Authors (16 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Jun 2017) by Radovan Krejci
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (16 Jul 2017)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (19 Jul 2017) by Radovan Krejci
AR by Bethan White on behalf of the Authors (29 Jul 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (22 Aug 2017) by Radovan Krejci
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Short summary
Aerosols influence cloud and precipitation by modifying cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNCs). We simulate three different types of convective cloud using two different cloud microphysics parameterisations. The simulated cloud and precipitation depends much more strongly on the choice of microphysics scheme than on CDNC. The uncertainty differs between types of convection. Our results highlight a large uncertainty in cloud and precipitation responses to aerosol in current models.
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