Articles | Volume 17, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11971–11989, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11971-2017

Special issue: NETCARE (Network on Aerosols and Climate: Addressing Key Uncertainties...

Special issue: Global and regional assessment of intercontinental transport...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 11971–11989, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-11971-2017

Research article 10 Oct 2017

Research article | 10 Oct 2017

Source attribution of Arctic black carbon constrained by aircraft and surface measurements

Jun-Wei Xu et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Junwei Xu on behalf of the Authors (01 Jul 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Jul 2017) by Lynn M. Russell
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (08 Jul 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (02 Aug 2017)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Aug 2017) by Lynn M. Russell
AR by Junwei Xu on behalf of the Authors (01 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Sep 2017) by Lynn M. Russell
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Short summary
We interpret a series of recent airborne and ground-based measurements with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint to attribute the sources of Arctic BC. Anthropogenic emissions in eastern and southern Asia make the largest contribution to Arctic BC. Gas flaring emissions from oilfields in western Siberia and from the Tarim oilfield in western China could have striking impacts on Arctic BC loadings.
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