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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 17, issue 17
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10515–10533, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10515-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Global and regional assessment of intercontinental transport...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 10515–10533, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-17-10515-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 08 Sep 2017

Research article | 08 Sep 2017

Tagged tracer simulations of black carbon in the Arctic: transport, source contributions, and budget

Kohei Ikeda et al.

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AR by Kohei Ikeda on behalf of the Authors (02 Aug 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (05 Aug 2017) by Gregory Carmichael
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Short summary
Black carbon (BC), also known as soot particles, plays a key role in Arctic warming; hence, an understanding of the major source regions and types is important for its mitigation. We found that Russia was the dominant contributor to Arctic BC at the surface level, while the East Asian contribution was the largest in the middle troposphere and the burden over the Arctic, suggesting that BC emission reduction from Russia and East Asia can help mitigate warming in the Arctic.
Black carbon (BC), also known as soot particles, plays a key role in Arctic warming; hence, an...
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