Articles | Volume 16, issue 14
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9201–9219, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9201-2016

Special issue: Coupled chemistry–meteorology modelling: status and...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9201–9219, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9201-2016

Research article 26 Jul 2016

Research article | 26 Jul 2016

The importance of plume rise on the concentrations and atmospheric impacts of biomass burning aerosol

Carolin Walter et al.

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AR by Carolin Walter on behalf of the Authors (31 May 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Jun 2016) by Alexander Baklanov
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Short summary
Buoyancy produced by vegetation fires can lead to substantial plume rise with consequences for the dispersion of aerosol emitted by the fires. To study this effect a 1-D plume rise model was included into the regional online integrated model system COSMO-ART. Comparing model results and satellite data for a case study of 2010 Canadian wildfires shows, that the plume rise model outperforms prescribed emission height. The radiative impact of the aerosol leads to a pronounced temperature change.
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