Articles | Volume 16, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7317–7333, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-7317-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7317–7333, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-7317-2016

Research article 13 Jun 2016

Research article | 13 Jun 2016

Simulated 2050 aviation radiative forcing from contrails and aerosols

Chih-Chieh Chen and Andrew Gettelman

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (14 May 2016)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 May 2016) by Christopher Hoyle
RR by Ulrich Schumann (20 May 2016)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (24 May 2016) by Christopher Hoyle
AR by Chih-Chieh Chen on behalf of the Authors (27 May 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The impact of aviation emissions through 2050 is simulated by a comprehensive global climate model. Four different future emission scenarios of the same flight tracks are considered. The results reveal that the global radiative forcing of contrail cirrus is positive and can increase by a factor of 7 in 2050 from the 2006 level. The aviation aerosols can produce negative forcing, mainly over the oceans, and increase by a factor of 4 in 2050 from the 2006 level.
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