Articles | Volume 16, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7195–7211, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-7195-2016
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 7195–7211, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-7195-2016

Research article 10 Jun 2016

Research article | 10 Jun 2016

Sources of organic ice nucleating particles in soils

Tom C. J. Hill et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Thomas Hill on behalf of the Authors (01 May 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (16 May 2016) by Alex Huffman
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Short summary
Even though aerosols that trigger the freezing of cloud droplets are rare, they can modify cloud properties and seed precipitation. While soil organic matter is a rich source of ice nucleating particles (INPs), we know little about them. The most active INPs (freeze supercooled water > −12 °C) in Wyoming and Colorado soils were organic, sensitive to heat (105 °C), and possibly fungal proteins in several soils, but they were not known species of ice nucleating bacteria. Many may also be carbohydrates.
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