Articles | Volume 15, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 845–865, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-845-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 845–865, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-845-2015

Research article 23 Jan 2015

Research article | 23 Jan 2015

Characterization of biomass burning emissions from cooking fires, peat, crop residue, and other fuels with high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

C. E. Stockwell et al.

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Short summary
We used a high-resolution proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer to measure emissions from peat, crop residue, cooking fires, etc. We assigned > 80% of the mass of gas-phase organic compounds and much of it was secondary organic aerosol precursors. The open cooking emissions were much larger than from advanced cookstoves. Little-studied N-containing organic compounds accounted for 0.1-8.7% of the fuel N and may influence new particle formation.
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