Articles | Volume 15, issue 5
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2405–2427, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2405-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 2405–2427, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-2405-2015

Research article 05 Mar 2015

Research article | 05 Mar 2015

Estimating sources of elemental and organic carbon and their temporal emission patterns using a least squares inverse model and hourly measurements from the St. Louis–Midwest supersite

B. de Foy et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Benjamin de Foy on behalf of the Authors (28 Aug 2014)  Author's response
ED: Reject (08 Oct 2014) by Michael Schulz
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (10 Nov 2014) by Ken Carslaw
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (21 Nov 2014)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (25 Nov 2014)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (09 Jan 2015) by Ken Carslaw
AR by Benjamin de Foy on behalf of the Authors (15 Jan 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (04 Feb 2015) by Ken Carslaw
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Short summary
Elemental carbon and organic carbon are components of fine particulate matter that are harmful to health. We use computer simulations of wind patterns and pollution dispersion to analyze a year-long time series of hourly measurements made at the St. Louis-Midwest supersite. The inverse method produced improved estimates of emissions of these pollutants by different types of sources such as on-road and off-road emissions and open burning.
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